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PACNY Announces the 2021 Preservation Award Winners!

PACNY is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Annual Preservation Awards! They include?

  • A Jasena R. Foley Award is given to Mr. Laurence Bousquet in recognition of his public walking tours of the Sedgwick Neighborhood in Syracuse as part of The Stand’s Photo Walks
  • The Pat Earle Award is given to the Howland Stone Store Museum in recognition of the successful completion of the Opendore Project in Sherwood
  • A Stewardship Award is given to Dr. Stephen and Judy Coleman for their long-term care of the Ezra A. Huntington house in Auburn
  • A Jasena R. Foley Award is given to the Cazenovia Preservation Foundation in recognition of over half a century of advocacy for historic buildings and cultural landscapes
  • The CNY Heritage Award is given to the Madison County Historical Society in recognition of the 25th Annual Madison County Hops Festival in Oneida
  • A Stewardship Award is given to Dale and Ann Tussing in recognition of dedicating over half a century of care and stewardship for their home, the 1812 John Gridley house in Syracuse

Two very special posthumous honors will also be given in recognition of two long-time supporters of PACNY and of the built heritage of Central New York.

  • The Paul Malo Award is given in honor of Mr. John A. “Jae” Evangelisti  
  • The Wilma T. Auer Award is given in honor of Mr. Dean Biancavilla

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the awards will be presented during a virtual, online ceremony to be held on October 27, 2021 at 6 p.m. The event is free to attend, but registration is required.

Register here!

Syracuse Bread Company building to be rehabilitated using Historic Tax Credits!

Developers Jason Evans, Matthew Rayo and Randall Hadzor plan to convert the 1912 Ward Wellington Ward-designed industrial building into a mixed-use property with residential and commercial units.

The Syracuse Bread Company factory at 200 Maple Street was designed by prolific Syracuse architect Ward Wellington Ward. Ward, who is best known for his residential designs, only designed a handful of industrial buildings. The Syracuse Bread Co. Factory building exhibits features of the transitional period in factory construction where the heavy load-bearing masonry “mill construction” of the nineteenth century began to give way to the concrete and steel daylight factory. The building was occupied by the Syracuse Bread Company until 1971, when it was purchased by the Cooper Decoration Company. It has been vacant since the early 2000s.

More info is available via the Syracuse.com article:

https://www.syracuse.com/business/2021/08/century-old-former-syracuse-bread-factory-to-be-turned-into-apartments.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=syracuse_nf&fbclid=IwAR0vNMJLr57GhimaCfurTCWEEadyARbo4xm_wrTuAhNcximonqmxevjCsiw.

Wall Street Church in Auburn demolished

Wall Street Church in 2016

This week PACNY’s five-county region lost another historic structure. The African Methodist Episcopal Church on Wall Street in Auburn, NY – known informally as the Wall Street Church – finally came down after years of uncertainty. As part of PACNY’s “Eight That Can’t Wait” threatened properties list in 2018, the Wall Street Church symbolized the plight of urban neighborhood churches across PACNY’s five-county region:

“Central New York’s historic places of worship in urban neighborhoods face acute threats not only due to high costs of building repair and maintenance, but also because they are more apt for consolidation with other nearby congregations and may be in neighborhoods facing high levels of poverty and population decline. Once closed, there are often substantial challenges in finding new, economically viable uses that can sustain architecturally intricate buildings with large auditoriums.”

After the removal of the steeple, windows, and bell.

A description from 2018 described the significance to a local community of color, and eluded to the potential for reuse:

“Located across the street from the walls of the Auburn state prison, the former Wall Street Methodist is a National Register-listed Gothic Revival-style auditorium-plan brick church built in 1887. The building is also notable for its 19th century biracial congregation that counted Harriet Tubman’s nephew among its members. The church became home to Auburn’s A.M.E. Zion Church in 1993, but the congregation was unable to afford major roof repairs, and vacated the building in the early 2000s. The building has since stood vacant, and its brick walls are crumbling. The building has recently changed ownership to a private individual who has not publicized plans for the property. Challenges for preservation and adaptive reuse include significant structural deterioration, the church’s location in a marginal neighborhood remote from downtown or other commercial areas, and its lack of local designation under Auburn’s preservation ordinance. Despite this, the building’s listing in the National Register makes it eligible for lucrative tax credits, and its spacious auditorium plan would make an ideal space for a community center, performance space, or a support facility for the state prison.”

The demolished Wall Street Church

Despite losses such as the Wall Street Church, PACNY continues to monitor the status of threatened properties across Central New York, and will work with any municipality, organization, or individual to conserve the unique cultural and architectural heritage of our region.